Bank Chor
STORY: Champak and his minions attempt a bank robbery, but Inspector Amjad Khan is ready to double-cross them. As they hatch an escape plan, a third player gets ready to rob them of their glory.

REVIEW: The blueprint of Bank Chor must have had one instruction on it: Include jokes about people that Indian Twitter users love to cringe-watch. So there’s an inexplicable cameo by Baba Sehgal, a really (really!) forced joke about Bappi Lahiri, a reference to Himesh Reshammiya and a throwaway line about a certain loudmouth news anchor.. Wonder why the writers left out Bobby Deol?

Bobby might have been spared, but the movie opens with a baba who enters the bank with a lota and a gun. No questions asked. This is Champak (Deshmukh) who plans to loot the bank with his partners Gulab (Arora) and Genda (Thapa). But before they can so much as inspect the situation inside, inspector Amjab Khan (Oberoi) lands up outside.

Khan lies to the media about having an undercover agent in the bank, making the amateur robbers panic. But he doesn’t know that his lie isn’t that off. The hostages in the bank soon get a rude surprise.

While the people on this side of the screen have seen it coming. The first half has puns that only the characters find funny, and situations that are too convenient to cause intrigue. You constantly find yourself coming up with better solutions to situations than the movie provides. However, it leaves logical flaws and silly antics behind and cleans up its (third) act.

The bumps in the script don’t hold back the performers. Riteish’s middle-class Marathiness endears him to the viewer; Vivek’s the perfect good cop to all the thugs around him; Thapa and Arora as two Delhi goons are hilarious — there’s a spin-off waiting to happen with these two. Rhea Chakraborty has perfected the art of succeeding in small, supporting roles without shouldering too much responsibility, and Sahil Vaid’s performance singularly pulls up the movie.

But otherwise, it is too reminiscent of bank-heist movies of the past; there are even clear shoutouts to the Dhoom franchise. A better plan of action and a few dry runs with the script would have ensured a product to bank on.

(Times Of India)